Ricotta Cheese Recipe

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy for more info.

As a cheese lover, I can easily say that this homemade ricotta cheese is 10x better than the store-bought version. It shouldn’t really be a surprise since homemade anything is better than what’s in the market, but for some reason, I always imagined making cheese to be this daunting task that would result in failure.

Ricotta Cheese Recipe

It’s kind of similar to the way I used to view homemade butter. Whenever I heard chefs talk about using their own butter, I immediately imagined an old lady from the 19th century churning cream in a big barrel. It’s ridiculous to imagine now that I know how very easy it is to make homemade butter (just pour heavy cream into a food processor and blend it until it clumps).

But dairy products had always seemed like a farmer’s niche and not mine. Like homemade butter, I’ve come to learn that homemade ricotta cheese can be done just as easily. 

homemade ricotta cheese in cheesecloth

Homemade Ricotta Cheese

The only kind of culinary “tool” you need is cheesecloth, and even that’s optional. Some people use coffee filters instead, but I personally can’t comment on its success as I’ve only ever used cheesecloth. 

You basically heat a combination of milk, cream, and salt in a large pot. You warm the mixture until it’s almost boiling (190 degrees F to be precise), before you remove the pot from the heat and add in acid (either lemon juice or distilled white vinegar). The acid will make the milk curdle after about 5 minutes.

You then pour the mixture into a damp, cheesecloth-lined sieve (which is sitting on top of a large bowl), and allow the whey (the milky/watery part) to drain from the actual cheese curds.

The result is an authentic ricotta cheese that is very difficult to find in any grocery store. 

homemade ricotta cheese spread

Ricotta Cheese Dessert Recipes

I let my cheese drain for quite awhile (overnight) because I like my ricotta creamy and thick (note: the cheese will thicken even more with time). I then spread the ricotta on a piece of toasted baguette and drizzle locally-harvested honey. It’s positively delicious and yet completely feasible for the everyday cook. 

I’ve also used my creation in ricotta cheese dessert recipes like my lemon ricotta cake. If you haven’t tried that recipe yet, I highly recommend you do – it’s one of the most popular recipes on my blog!

Ricotta Cheese Pasta Recipes

You can also try a variety of ricotta cheese pasta recipes, like a simple lasagna recipe or even delicious tarts like this tomato ricotta one. The options are endless, and with a batch of homemade ricotta in your arsenal, any dish you create with it is bound to taste fantastic! 

 

homemade ricotta cheese spread

Ricotta Cheese Recipe

Yield: 1
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

A simple and easy recipe for making homemade ricotta cheese. 

Ingredients

  • 3 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp distilled white vinegar or lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Heat milk, cream and salt in a large pot over low heat until simmering (use a thermometer to test - should reach 190 degrees when ready).
  2. Stir mixture occasionally. Remove mixture from heat and add vinegar or lemon juice. Give it a gentle stir and then let it rest for about 5 minutes.
  3. Cover a sieve with a few layers of damp cheesecloth and rest the sieve over a large bowl.
  4. Pour the cheese mixture into the cloth and let it drain for approximately 1 hour. Serve at room temperature or refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 4 or 5 days.

Notes

The longer the ricotta rests in the sieve, the thicker it will be as more of the liquid will drain off.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 1 Serving Size: 1 Servings
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 1267

12 thoughts on “Ricotta Cheese Recipe”

  1. Hi!
    Thanks for the recipe, I love your blog.
    I’m not American so I guess that the temperature is in F°? That would be around 90°C

    Is that okay?

    Reply
  2. Is a thermometer absolutely necessary?
    If not, what would be the best way to tell when the milk and cream mixture is up to the correct temperature?

    Reply
    • Hi Shre! A thermometer is the most foolproof way to do it, but you can also look for the point in which the milk begins to bubble and foam along the edges of the pot but is not yet boiling. You don’t want to let the milk boil. Instead, when you see it beginning to bubble and foam along the edges, pull it off the stove and add the lemon juice (or vinegar). Give it a gentle stir and wait at least 5 minutes for it to form curds. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Just made both your ricotta and marmalade recipe today. They are both delicious! I plan on using the ricotta for homemade ravioli later tonight. Thank you for a delicious recipe!

    Reply
  4. Now I’m wondering how to make my own butter. Is this already on your site? Thanks! You’re recipes are very inspiring!

    Reply
    • Hi Stacey! Thank you so much for the kind feedback! 🙂 I will definitely have to add a butter recipe to my site. Maybe one savory and one sweet! 🙂 Thanks for the idea!

      Reply

Leave a Comment